Hurricane Isaias batters Bahamas as storm targets entire U.S. East Coast

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Hurricane Isaias batters Bahamas as storm targets entire U.S. East Coast
Fecha de publicación: 
31 July 2020
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Hurricane Isaias became 2020′s second Atlantic hurricane overnight Wednesday on its way to the Bahamas, which it has already begun to blast with drenching rain, strong winds and ocean surge. The storm is now poised to ride up the East Coast, first encountering Florida this weekend before zipping up the rest of the Eastern Seaboard through the Mid-Atlantic and New England during the first-half of next week.

Tropical storm conditions could begin along the east coast of Florida as soon as Saturday as the storm makes a beeline northward on a menacing path along the coast.

“There is a risk of impacts from winds, heavy rainfall, and storm surge late this weekend from the northeastern Florida coast and spreading northward along the remainder of the U.S. east coast through early next week,” wrote the National Hurricane Center.

Hurricane Isaias became 2020′s second Atlantic hurricane overnight Wednesday on its way to the Bahamas, which it has already begun to blast with drenching rain, strong winds and ocean surge. The storm is now poised to ride up the East Coast, first encountering Florida this weekend before zipping up the rest of the Eastern Seaboard through the Mid-Atlantic and New England during the first-half of next week.

Tropical storm conditions could begin along the east coast of Florida as soon as Saturday as the storm makes a beeline northward on a menacing path along the coast.

“There is a risk of impacts from winds, heavy rainfall, and storm surge late this weekend from the northeastern Florida coast and spreading northward along the remainder of the U.S. east coast through early next week,” wrote the National Hurricane Center.

Hurricane Isaias became 2020′s second Atlantic hurricane overnight Wednesday on its way to the Bahamas, which it has already begun to blast with drenching rain, strong winds and ocean surge. The storm is now poised to ride up the East Coast, first encountering Florida this weekend before zipping up the rest of the Eastern Seaboard through the Mid-Atlantic and New England during the first-half of next week.

Tropical storm conditions could begin along the east coast of Florida as soon as Saturday as the storm makes a beeline northward on a menacing path along the coast.

“There is a risk of impacts from winds, heavy rainfall, and storm surge late this weekend from the northeastern Florida coast and spreading northward along the remainder of the U.S. east coast through early next week,” wrote the National Hurricane Center.

Stateside, tropical storm warnings have been hoisted for areas between Homestead and just south of Melbourne, Fla., including the cities of Miami, Fort Lauderdale and Palm Beach. Lake Okeechobee is also under a warning. A hurricane watch is in effect from near Boca Raton north to the Space Coast.

The tropical threat comes as the Sunshine State continues to grapple with a sharp increase in coronavirus cases. A hurricane watch is in effect for much of Florida’s east coast.

Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) issued a state of emergency for counties along Florida’s Atlantic coast.

He said that the state is prepared to open shelters while ensuring proper protocols be taken in the face of the covid-19 pandemic.

“Very early on the division created a [personal protective equipment] reserve for hurricane season,” said DeSantis at a news conference on Friday. “Right now on hand they have 20 million masks, 22 million gloves … and 20,000 thermometers.”

Florida had originally planned to shut down all statewide covid-19 testing locations until Aug. 5 due to Isaias but the state appears to be reevaluating and may adjust depending on which locations are affected by the storm.

Farther up the East Coast, a close shave or direct hit are possible from Isaias, which may remain a hurricane as it treks north.

 

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